Ropeid

Architect:
Jensen & Skodvin Arkitektkontor
Finished
2004 og 2021
Fake tekst for publisering Photo: Frid-Jorunn Stabell, Statens vegvesen.

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Sognefjellshytta

An exterior of wood and glass disperses the light entering the room, thus communicating the varied ambience of light and weather in the high mountains.

Architect:
Jensen & Skodvin Arkitektkontor
Finished
2014
Sognefjellshytta.
Sognefjellshytta. Photo: Råmund Mundhjeld, Sognefjellshytta

The Sognefjell Lodge has been refurbished with a new and characteristic interior, including a more functional entrance area, a larger reception and universal accessibility. The new addition is constructed in latticework patterned in triangles that mirror the existing gables on each side. An exterior of wood and glass disperses the light entering the room, thus communicating the varied ambience of light and weather in the high mountains.

To Sognefjellshytta

Havøysund Artwork

Artist:
Roni Horn
Architect:
Jensen & Skodvin Arkitektkontor
Finished
2021
Havøysund artwork.
Havøysund artwork. Photo: Frid-Jorunn Stabell, Statens vegvesen

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Oscarshaug

The toilet at this place has been given a new solid steel superstructure.

Architect:
Jensen & Skodvin Arkitektkontor
Finished
2020
Oscarshaug.
Oscarshaug. Photo: Frid-Jorunn Stabell, Statens vegvesen

From the parking area there is a well-maintained path up to the cairn at the top of Oscarshaug. The path has a simple steel railing. The area has room for two buses, five motorhomes and 20 passenger cars.

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Mefjellet

At the rest area at Mefjellet you can experience both the majestic view over the mountains and the art of Knut Wold.

Architect:
Jensen & Skodvin Arkitektkontor
Artist:
Knut Wold
Finished
1997
Mefjellet.
Mefjellet. Photo: Roger Ellingsen, Statens vegvesen

The rest area was created in collaboration with the architect Jan Olav Jensen and was the first point to be developed on the Norwegian Scenic Routes.  The idea was to make the rest area into a large “nature gallery” to reinforce the panoramic view and the feeling of loftiness. The rest area at Mefjellet was designed as a terrace with natural stone walls. We placed a “cubist” stone sculpture of larvikite out on the plateau wich frames the Smørstabb pinnacles and the grandeur of the surrounding landscape.

Knut Wold is a Norwegian sculptor living in Stange. He studied at Alanus Hochschule der Kunste and Hochschule der Kunste, Berlin. Wold frequently works with objects in large masses of only partially worked stone.

To Mefjellet

Liasanden

Liasanden in the Leirdalen valley, Lom municipality, has been a popular rest area for ages.

Architect:
Jensen & Skodvin Arkitektkontor
Finished
1997
Liasanden.
Liasanden. Photo: Jarle Wæhler, Statens vegvesen

However, more than 13 years of service to visitors had left their mark on the forest floor and the terrain leading down to the riverbank.

The architects saw that a completely different and idyllic rest area could be placed in this pine grove. Here, the forest and the terrain have determined the shape of the rest area, down to most minute detail. The gravel road is shaped like a “stream” that widens and narrows in harmony with the terrain. Concrete furniture was placed in the pine grove, and along with the service facilities and an information stand in wood and concrete, the rest area has become a complete and functional location for travellers.

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Øvstefoss

The Øvstefoss waterfall lies at the end of the Hjelledalen valley, just below the crossing with the Gamle Strynefjellsvegen.

Architect:
Jensen & Skodvin Arkitektkontor
Finished
2010
Øvstefoss.
Øvstefoss. Photo: Werner Harstad, Statens vegvesen

Together with Hjelle and the Jøl bridge, the waterfall offers an interesting rest area that previously belonged to the original Strynefjell road, before tunnels ensured year-round traffic between east and west. For more than 100 years, the Øvstefoss waterfall has amazed travellers crossing the Strynefjell mountains. In 1997, the Norwegian Public Roads Administration opened an information site devoted to the Norwegian Scenic Routes and designed by Jensen & Skodvin at Øvstefoss. For many years, the safety of the path leading down along the waterfall remained questionable, but since 2010 visitors can tread safely. Steel railings, approximately 200 metres in length, have been mounted as an extension of the information site. The railings ensure that visitors can safely enjoy a first-hand experience of the swirling waterfall.

To Øvstefoss

Gudbrandsjuvet

Gudbrandsjuvet is a five metre wide and 20‒25 metre long gorge, through which the Valldøla river runs.

Architect:
Jensen & Skodvin Arkitektkontor
Finished
2010
Gudbrandsjuvet.
Gudbrandsjuvet. Photo: Roger Ellingsen, Statens vegvesen

The gorge is easily accessible near National Road 63 between Valldal and Trollstigen. Here, Jan Olav Jensen has designed a functional and safe viewing platform with ample space. A unique bridge has been built from the car park down to the viewing platform, leading visitors down to the gorge. The gradient of the bridge is designed for accessibility for wheelchair users. In cooperation with the architect, Civil Engineer Finn Erik Nilsen has challenged the laws of physics to create an 80 metre long hybrid of a suspension bridge and a rigid frame. The Gudbrandsjuvet Café is built of durable materials, such as glass and concrete. Within walking distance of the gorge you can find the Juvet Landscape Hotel, also designed by Jensen & Skodvin, which is well worth a visit.

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Videfossen

This waterfall has been an attraction ever since tourists started to cross the mountain a long time ago.

Architect:
Jensen & Skodvin Arkitektkontor
Finished
1997
Videfossen.
Videfossen. Photo: Hege Lysholm, Statens vegvesen

At some point, it was provided with a minimum of safety in the form of poles and wire mesh. When the Norwegian Public Roads Administration started its work on the route in 1994, the site was in a dire state of disrepair. In addition, the location is occasionally exposed to avalanches. The initial idea was to remove the railing and leave the waterfall as an immediate and natural experience. However, removal of the safety installations would have involved a considerable responsibility. The architect contacted avalanche experts and chose a solution that would stop avalanches but leave the view unobstructed. The steel plates were point-welded to permit them to give way under extreme loads. At the same time, the plates act as snow barriers during especially snowy winters, and direct any avalanches over and above the facility. Improvements at Videfossen also included construction of a new walkway with railings leading to the vantage point.

To Videfossen