Jøl bru

In his proposed project, the architect wishes to emphasize three elements.

Architect:
3RW - Jakob Røssvik
Jøl bru.
Jøl bru. Photo: Trine Kanter Zerwekh, Statens vegvesen

Ever since the Strynefjell road was converted to all-year traffic and a new bridge was built next to the original one, the old Jøl bridge has lain there like a forgotten gem. The old bridge is not readily visible to those who are unfamiliar with this piece of Norwegian road history. In his proposed project, the architect wishes to emphasize three elements. First, to draw attention to the bridge’s uniquely hand-crafted construction, formed in an apparently perfect semicircle – a unique piece of road craftsmanship dating from 1883, second, to enhance the view of the architecture of the old bridge, and third, emphasize the gorge and its swirling river 60 metres below.

The choice of materials and construction will be crucial in striking an appropriate balance between the old bridge and its new walkway, so as not to overshadow the old bridge, but on the contrary, to showcase this unique construction and its history as a central element in the surrounding landscape.

To Jøl bru

Askevågen

This little vantage point with its panoramic view is located on the Atlantic Road.

Architect:
3RW - Jakob Røssvik
Landscape architect:
Smedsvig Landskapsarkitekter AS
Finished
2005
Askevågen.
Askevågen. Photo: Jarle Wæhler, Statens vegvesen

The viewing platform brings visitors in close contact with the Atlantic Ocean and the mighty forces of nature it embodies. The vantage point is built as a self-supporting construction in naval hull plates bolted to the existing breakwater, from where visitors can come even closer to the ocean and enjoy the panoramic view over the archipelago and the fishing port of Askvågen.

To Askevågen

Kjeksa

The vantage point at Kjeksa is located near the fishing hamlet of Bud on the Atlantic Road.

Architect:
3RW - Jakob Røssvik
Landscape architect:
Smedsvig Landskapsarkitekter AS
Finished
2005
Fake tekst for publisering Photo: Per Kollstad, Statens vegvesen

Here, the architect wished to design a rest area that would invite visitors to explore the landscape facing Hustadvika with its islets and skerries, an area where architecture helps emphasize the qualities of the landscape. The rest area has been placed around two old trees that constitute a central element framed by benches and gravel. The green gravel surface, a by-product from local smelters, is held in place by a hidden steel frame. A narrow path in light-coloured concrete follows the undulations of the landscape, leading you to the water’s edge.

To Kjeksa