Hellåga

Hellåga rest area is located on the northern shore of the Sjona fjord, with a view towards the archipelago in the west.

Landscape architect:
Landskapsfabrikken AS - Inge Dahlman
Finished
2006
Hellåga.
Hellåga. Photo: Steinar Skaar, Statens vegvesen

Its striking service building has the shape of a wave, built as a unique concrete structure with a façade covered in tempered glass. The site also has a waste-dumping station for camper vans.

This project was developed on the site of a previous rest area. The main intention of the landscape architect was to reflect the long lines of the mountain formations on the other side of the fjord, as well as to improve accessibility to the water’s edge. The rest area was designed on the basis of two different impressions of the landscape. From the large gravel-covered terrace the view opens to the immensity of the landscape, with the ocean and the mountainsides, and across the fjord to the sky and the view of the archipelago. From the gravel terrace, visitors are guided down to the sea below, where benches are spread out over the rocks.

The servicebuilding is designed by Nordplan AS - Arlild Waage
The rest area is designed by Landskapsfabrikken AS - Inge Dahlman

To Hellåga

Akkarvikodden

Akkarvikodden offers the best reflection of the profile of the Norwegian Scenic Route Lofoten, with horizontal planes and bold lines.

Landscape architect:
Landskapsfabrikken AS - Inge Dahlman
Architect:
manthey kula as
Finished
2009
Akkarvikodden.
Akkarvikodden. Photo: Steinar Skaar, Statens vegvesen

The main idea behind the design of this rest area was to raise a podium in the landscape to reflect the ocean surface, the horizon and the mountains behind the site. A long concrete terrace has been placed on the promontory near the open ocean. The groups of furniture on the terrace are placed in a rotated fashion, so that visitors must actively choose their own position in relation to the surroundings. At the back, the rest area is bordered by a natural stone wall that establishes a precise visual delimitation towards the mountains and screens the site off from the road. The terrace and the tables are made of concrete, while the benches and walls are cut from local Lødingen granite at various stages of processing.

The service building appears as a clean-cut geometrical shape which is closed off from its surroundings and open to the light from the sky. The dramatic landscape is blocked out. From a distance, the building is perceived as a landmark.

The rest area is designed by Landskapsfabrikken AS - Inge Dahlman
The service building is designed by manthey kula as

To Akkarvikodden

Austnesfjorden

This rest area offers a magnificent view over the Austnesfjord and the chapel at Sildpollneset promontory.

Landscape architect:
Landskapsfabrikken AS - Inge Dahlman
Finished
2010
Austnesfjorden.
Austnesfjorden. Photo: Steinar Skaar, Statens vegvesen

The chapel is one of the most frequently photographed spots in the entire Lofoten archipelago. Large numbers of visitors had completely eroded the vegetation. A wooden walkway was therefore built up to the top of the Austneset promontory. From the car park, a viewing platform has been established to provide access to the view also for those with reduced mobility.

To Austnesfjorden

Kleivodden

Landscape architect:
Landskapsfabrikken AS - Inge Dahlman
Finished
2013
Kleivodden.
Kleivodden. Photo: Roger Ellingsen, Statens vegvesen

To Kleivodden

Folldal gruver

The Folldal mines are among Norway’s ten most important historical industrial sites, and the area is protected under the Cultural Heritage Act.

Landscape architect:
Landskapsfabrikken AS - Inge Dahlman
Finished
2011
Folldal.
Folldal. Photo: Jarle Wæhler, Statens vegvesen

The Folldal mines are an old mining community located on the Norwegian Scenic Route Rondane, built around the copper mine that was established in 1784. The Folldal mines are among Norway’s ten most important historical industrial sites, and the area is protected under the Cultural Heritage Act. The intervention has therefore been planned in collaboration with cultural heritage authorities and the Folldal Mines Foundation.

The assignment consisted in establishing an unmanned information point on the Rondane national park and the mining facility, to be located at the gravel site on the slag tip in front of the old mine, and moreover to organize the parking area and ensure an inviting access for visitors coming from the car park to the visitors’ centre. The attraction on the site is the historical mining community. The information point was given a plain and subdued design. The materials are mainly those primarily used in existing structures on the site: corroded steel, sand and gravel.

To Folldal gruver